Home » Accountability » Confronting the Credibility Crisis

Confronting the Credibility Crisis

Hillary Clinton has been called a lot of things.  But branding her the “cancer” of the Democratic Party ratchets the vitriol up to a new level.

More significant is who’s doing the name-calling.  When Donna Brazile, Former Democratic National Committee Chair and longtime party stalwart, launches an internecine assault worthy of Donald Trump, it’s hard not to take notice.

Robby Mook certainly noticed. “Her claims are laughable,” the former Clinton campaign manager told Anderson Cooper.  But Elizabeth Warren wasn’t laughing.  Instead, the Massachusetts Senator invoked Ms. Brazile’s account of Clintonian malfeasance as evidence that the Democratic primary had been “rigged.”

So what are we to believe?  Mrs. Clinton has been getting away with moral murder for years.  Are the party faithful finally drawing a line?  Or is Ms. Brazile merely trying to sell books while Senator Warren postures for the 2020 election?

Time may tell.  But in the meantime, the undeniable victim is credibility.

TOO MANY CROOKS

There was a time when hustlers and lawbreakers would abandon their denials once evidence of wrongdoing grew overwhelming and indisputable.  But today’s culture of fake news and fake outrage has spawned a limitless capacity for brazenness.

I am not a crook.  I did not have sex with that woman.  If you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor.  I remember landing under sniper fire.  The Art of the Deal is the number one selling business book of all time.

Even the investigators of corruption fall under suspicion.  Robert Mueller, the special counsel looking into Russian election tampering, has himself been implicated in the scandal he is charged with investigating.  Mr. Mueller arrived on the scene with bipartisan plaudits for his character and integrity.  Now we aren’t sure if we can believe that, either.

You would think in an age like ours, when every word and deed appears instantaneously as part of the public record, that public figures would be exercise more caution in what they do and say.  Instead, they seem to care less than ever.

It’s not hard to understand why.  Mainstream news outlets largely ignore stories inconsistent with their political ideologies.  News consumers visit only those outlets that provide stories confirming their political biases.  And the epidemic of inaccuracy leaves us so jaded that we feel justified believing whatever we want about anyone we choose.

The crisis of confidence in our political system is reason enough for dismay.  But there’s an even more profound cause for alarm – the corrosive effect of cynicism on our collective conscience and moral clarity.

LEMMING MENTALITY SYNDROME

There may be no more malignant phrase in the English language than everyone does it.  Our parents didn’t tolerate hearing it from us, and as responsible parents we refuse to tolerate it from our children.  But anything that is repeated enough plants itself in our consciousness, where it insidiously takes root and refuses to let go.

All the more so when the media bombard us with evidence that we can’t trust our leaders, can’t trust our icons, can’t trust the spokesmen for moral values to uphold the values they espouse.  And if the people I’m supposed to look up to act without scruples, why should I worry about how I look in the eyes of others?

The solution, therefore, is relatively straightforward:  start looking in a different direction.

In the first verse of his first psalm, King David writes:  Fortunate is the one who does not walk in the counsel of the wicked, does not stand in the path of misguided people, and does not sit in the company of cynics.

The more we associate with those who reject ethical values, the more automatically we adopt their ways.  The more we expose ourselves to the influence of those who embrace moral relativism, the more we disable our own moral compass.  The more we keep company with those who view everything and everyone in a negative light, the more we grow convinced that there is no reason to hold ourselves to a higher standard.

But if we remove ourselves from corrupting influences by seeking out company and counsel from people of integrity, and by searching out the good instead of fixating on the bad – then we will find ourselves drawn steadily upward, and we will begin to draw those around us upward as well.

Published by Jewish World Review

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1 Comment

  1. Sydney Chase says:

    Good one!

    Sid

    >

    Like

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